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Sage

Sage, Garden Sage, Red Sage, Purpletop Sage- Salvia officinalis var. rubia, Labiateae

SageCollection: The leaves should be gathered shortly before or just at the beginning of flowering in dry sunny weather in May or June. Dry in the shade or not above 35 degrees C.

Part Used: Leaves.

Constituents:

  • Volatile oil, containing [alpha] and [beta]-thujone as the major components, with cineole, borneol, camphor, 2-methyl-3-methylene-5-heptene and others
  • Diterpene bitters; picrosalvin (carnosol), carnosolic acid and others
  • Flavonoids; salvigenin, genkwanin, 6-methoxygendwanin, hispidulin, luteolina
  • Phenolic acids; rosmarinic, caffeic, labiatic etc.
  • Salviatannin, a condensed catechin.

Actions: Carminative, antispasmodic, antimicrobial, astringent, anti-inflammatory.

sageIndications: Red Sage is the classic remedy for inflammations of the mouth, throat and tonsils, its volatile oils soothing the mucous membranes. It may be used internally and as a mouth wash for inflamed and bleeding gums (gingivitis), inflamed tongue (glossitis) or generalized mouth inflammation (stomatitis). It is an excellent remedy in mouth ulcers (apthae). As a gargle it will aid in the treatment oflaryngitis, pharyngitis,tonsillitis andquinsy. It is a valuable carminative used in dyspepsia. It reduces sweating when taken internally and may be used to reduce the production of breast milk. As a compress it promotes the healing of wounds. Red Sage stimulates the muscles of the uterus and so should be avoided during pregnancy.

Priest & Priest tell us that it is a "carminative, stimulating astringent - especially suitable for weak, pale, atonic patients. Cold preparations check excessive perspiration from circulatory debility." They give the following specific indications: gastric debility and flatulence, night sweats, sore ulcerated throat.

CAUTION: Avoid during pregnancy.

Combinations: As a gargle for throat conditions it combines well with Tormentil and Balm of Gilead. In dyspepsia it can be combined with Meadowsweet and Chamomile.

Preparation and dosage:
Infusion: pour a cup of boiling water onto 1-2 teaspoonfuls of the leaves and let infuse for l0 minutes. This should be drunk three times a day. Mouthwash: put 2 teaspoonfuls of the leaves in half a liter ( one pint) of water, bring to the boil and let stand, covered, for 15 minutes. Gargle deeply with the hot tea for 5-l0 minutes several times a day. Tincture: take 2-4 ml of the tincture three times a day.

Remedies for:Carminative, antispasmodic, antimicrobial, astringent, anti-inflammatory, sudorific, expectorant, tonic, aromatic, nervine, vermifuge, emmenagogue, diuretic, stimulant, diaphoretic, stomachic, antiseptic.

Red Sage is the classic remedy for inflammations of the mouth, throat and tonsils, its volatile oils soothing the mucous membranes. Used as a mouth wash for inflamed and bleeding gums (gingivitis), inflamed tongue (glossitis) or generalized mouth inflammation (stomatitis). An excellent remedy in mouth ulcers (apthae). As a gargle it will aid in the treatment of laryngitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis and quinsy. A valuable carminative used in dyspepsia. It reduces sweating when taken internally and may be used to reduce the production of breast milk. As a compress it promotes the healing of wounds. Red Sage stimulates the muscles of the uterus and so should be avoided during pregnancy. Jethro Kloss calls sage an almost "cure-all - you could never go amiss if you take sage."

Combinations: As a gargle for throat conditions it combines well with Tormentil and Balm of Gilead. In dyspepsia it can be combined with Meadowsweet and Chamomile.

Dosage:

Infusion: Pour a cup of boiling water onto 1-2 teaspoonfuls of the leaves and let infuse for 10 minutes. This should be drunk three times a day. Mouthwash: put 2 teaspoonfuls of the leaves in half a liter (one pint) of water, bring to the boil and let stand, covered, for 15 minutes. Gargle deeply with the hot tea for 5-10 minutes several times a day.
Tincture: take 2-4 ml of the tincture three times a day.

History of Sage

The meaning of sage's botanical (Latin) name, salvia, is to help or to save, same word-root as salvation.

In Arabic, sage has the refined name "mariamiya," derived from the name Miriam (Mary), the mother of Jesus.

According to Arab tradition, Mary and Jesus fled from Bethlehem, where he was born, because they feared the anger of King Herod's soldiers.

It was during the summer. The mother and her child, tired and sweaty, searched for a little shade and a place where they could rest. In their flight, they encountered a three-lobed sage bush, with silvery leaves and a wonderful scent. Mary put her child down in the shade of the bush, picked the leaves, and used them to wipe her burning face.

The sweet intoxicating smell of the sage plant revived her and the tiny infant, and Mary blessed the bush. On that day, the sage plant received the name "blessed mariamiya.

Sage also has a place in Jewish tradition.

Land of Israel nature researchers have linked the Hebrew name of the plant, Marva, with Mt. Moriah. Some claim that the form of the seven-branch menorah originally symbolized the shape of the sage plant that grows in the Land of Israel.

The Healing Properties of sage

Sage has been used as a spice and a healing herb for thousands of years. The ancient Egyptians used sage as a drug to guarantee fertility. In ancient Greece, Dioscorides reported that when boiled in water, the liquid extract from the sage plant stopped bleeding from cuts and wounds, and prevented hoarseness and coughing. During the Roman era, Pliny reported that the sage plant improved memory. In ancient Greece, Hippocrates was quoted as asking, "How can a person die if sage is growing in his garden?

The ancient world used the sage plant for a variety of ills: toothache, menstrual cramps, abdominal pain, cardiac problems, eye inflammation, colds, hand tremors, hemorrhoids, and to disinfect wounds, stop hemorrhaging, kill lice, strengthen the immune system, and treat many other diseases and injuries.

New research suggests that sage may restore mental function and improve memory. The herb acts on the cortex of the brain thereby eliminating mental exhaustion and improving concentration.

Sage Tea

Preparation of sage tea: It can be prepared by pouring a cup of boiling water over 1 teaspoon of dried sage leaves with lid on. It should be infused for few minutes before straining and sweetening with honey, if desired. In case of fresh leaves, a tablespoon of chopped sage leaves can be used and the tea be prepared similarly.

Sage Tea Benefits: Sage tea is beneficial in coping with stress. It is astringent, sedative and expels gas; it clears the respiratory tract, makes a good gargle for sore throats, can be used for body odor and helps overcome colds.

Sage is useful for night sweats as it reduces sweating. It also reduces milk flow in nursing mothers prior to weaning, prevents the formation of kidney stones by dissolving residues of uric acid, and regularizes menstruation. An infusion of sage can be applied to the scalp to reduce dandruff.

Precautions: In high doses, sage can overstimulate and should be avoided by anyone who suffers from epilepsy. It should also be avoided in early pregnancy.


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