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$$32.95Minerals \ Iodine28026
TDM8026

TransDerma Minerals

Potassium Iodide

Thyroid Protection from Radiation

Protect Your Thyroid Gland from Radioactive Iodine in case of a nuclear accident Our USP Grade Postassium Ioidide (KI) is safe to ingest even for an extended period Your thyroid gland will absorb all halides, including iodine isotopes, bromine, and fluoride - elements that wi
TransDerma MineralsPotassium Iodide

TransDerma Minerals

Potassium Iodide

Thyroid Protection from Radiation

  • Pure medical grade Potassium Iodide, as used by emergency services
  • Small size will save your family, large size will save your village
  • Prevent Thyroid destruction from a Nuclear Accident - have it on hand
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Description

Protect Your Thyroid Gland from Radioactive Iodine in case of a nuclear accident

Our USP Grade Postassium Ioidide (KI) is safe to ingest even for an extended period

Your thyroid gland will absorb all halides, including iodine isotopes, bromine, and fluoride - elements that will make it less efficient, and potentially completely disable it, unless it is already saturated with good iodine. Our KI is safe to store for many years in your emergency kit for the event of a radioactive fallout heading your way.

What is Potassium Iodide (KI)?

Potassium iodide (also called KI) is a salt of stable (not radioactive) iodine. Stable iodine is an important chemical needed by the body to make thyroid hormones. Most of the stable iodine in our bodies comes from the food we eat. KI is stable iodine in a medicine form. This fact sheet from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) gives you some basic information about KI. It explains what you should think about before you or a family member takes KI.

What does KI do?

Following a radiological or nuclear event, radioactive iodine may be released into the air and then be breathed into the lungs. Radioactive iodine may also contaminate the local food supply and get into the body through food or through drink. When radioactive materials get into the body through breathing, eating, or drinking, we say that “internal contamination” has occurred. In the case of internal contamination with radioactive iodine, the thyroid gland quickly absorbs this chemical. Radioactive iodine absorbed by the thyroid can then injure the gland. Because non-radioactive KI acts to block radioactive iodine from being taken into the thyroid gland, it can help protect this gland from injury.

  • Pure medical grade Potassium Iodide, as used by emergency services
  • Small size will save your family, large size will save your village
  • Prevent Thyroid destruction from a Nuclear Accident - have it on hand
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 TDM8026Crystals: 26 g = 1 ozOut of Stock$32.95BUY
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 TDM8100Crystals: 100 g = 3.5 ozOut of Stock$109.95BUY
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Details

What KI cannot do

Knowing what KI cannot do is also important. KI cannot prevent radioactive iodine from entering the body. KI can protect only the thyroid from radioactive iodine, not other parts of the body. KI cannot reverse the health effects caused by radioactive iodine once damage to the thyroid has occurred. KI cannot protect the body from radioactive elements other than radioactive iodine—if radioactive iodine is not present, taking KI is not protective.

How does KI work?

The thyroid gland cannot tell the difference between stable and radioactive iodine and will absorb both. KI works by blocking radioactive iodine from entering the thyroid. When a person takes KI, the stable iodine in the medicine gets absorbed by the thyroid. Because KI contains so much stable iodine, the thyroid gland becomes “full” and cannot absorb any more iodine—either stable or radioactive—for the next 24 hours.

Iodized table salt also contains iodine; iodized table salt contains enough iodine to keep most people healthy under normal conditions. However, table salt does not contain enough iodine to block radioactive iodine from getting into your thyroid gland. You should not use table salt as a substitute for KI.

How well does KI work?

Knowing that KI may not give a person 100% protection against radioactive iodine is important. How well KI blocks radioactive iodine depends on

  • how much time passes between contamination with radioactive iodine and the taking of KI (the sooner a person takes KI, the better),
  • how fast KI is absorbed into the blood, and
  • the total amount of radioactive iodine to which a person is exposed.

Who should take KI?

The thyroid glands of a fetus and of an infant are most at risk of injury from radioactive iodine. Young children and people with low stores of iodine in their thyroid are also at risk of thyroid injury.

Infants (including breast-fed infants): Infants need to be given the recommended dosage of KI for babies. The amount of KI that gets into breast milk is not enough to protect breast-fed infants from exposure to radioactive iodine. The proper dose of KI given to a nursing infant will help protect it from radioactive iodine that it breathes in or drinks in breast milk.

Children: The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that all children internally contaminated with (or likely to be internally contaminated with) radioactive iodine take KI, unless they have known allergies to iodine. Children from newborn to 18 years of age are the most sensitive to the potentially harmful effects of radioactive iodine.

Young Adults: The FDA recommends that young adults (between the ages of 18 and 40 years) internally contaminated with (or likely to be internally contaminated with) radioactive iodine take the recommended dose of KI. Young adults are less sensitive to the effects of radioactive iodine than are children.

Pregnant Women: Because all forms of iodine cross the placenta, pregnant women should take KI to protect the growing fetus. However, pregnant women should take only one dose of KI following internal contamination with (or likely internal contamination with) radioactive iodine.

Breastfeeding Women: Women who are breastfeeding should take only one dose of KI if they have been internally contaminated with (or are likely to be internally contaminated with) radioactive iodine. Because radioactive iodine quickly gets into breast milk, CDC recommends that women internally contaminated with (or are likely to be internally contaminated with) radioactive iodine stop breastfeeding and feed their child baby formula or other food if it is available. If breast milk is the only food available for an infant, nursing should continue.

Adults: Adults older than 40 years should not take KI unless public health or emergency management officials say that contamination with a very large dose of radioactive iodine is expected. Adults older than 40 years have the lowest chance of developing thyroid cancer or thyroid injury after contamination with radioactive iodine. They also have a greater chance of having allergic reactions to KI.

When should I take KI?

After a radiologic or nuclear event, local public health or emergency management officials will tell the public if KI or other protective actions are needed. For example, public health officials may advise you to remain in your home, school, or place of work (this is known as “shelter-in-place”) or to evacuate. You may also be told not to eat some foods and not to drink some beverages until a safe supply can be brought in from outside the affected area. Following the instructions given to you by these authorities can lower the amount of radioactive iodine that enters your body and lower the risk of serious injury to your thyroid gland.

How much KI should I take?

The FDA has approved two different forms of KI—tablets and liquid—that people can take by mouth after a nuclear radiation emergency. The less than saturated Potassium Iodide solution made with TransDerma Minerals Potassium Iodide USP contains 130 mg per 5 mL (1 teaspoon) which equals one adult dose.

According to the FDA, the following doses are appropriate to take after internal contamination with (or likely internal contamination with) radioactive iodine:

  • Adults should take 130 mg (five mL - 1 teaspoon - of less than saturated solution).
  • Women who are breast feeding should take the adult dose of 130 mg (five mL - 1 teaspoon - of less than saturated solution).
  • Children between 3 and 18 years of age should take 65 mg (2.5 mL - 1/2 teaspoon - of less than saturated solution). Children who are adult size (greater than or equal to 150 pounds) should take the full adult dose, regardless of their age.
  • Infants and children between 1 month and 3 years of age should take 32 mg (1.25 mL - 1/4 teaspoon - of less than saturated solution). This dose is for both nursing and non-nursing infants and children.
  • Newborns from birth to 1 month of age should be given 16 mg (.63 mL - 1/8 teaspoon - of less than saturated solution). This dose is for both nursing and non-nursing newborn infants.

Less than saturated Potassium Iodide (KI) solutions, when properly mixed, should give even more accurate dosages because there is more solution overall to be measured out per dose. For example, mixing and dissolving exactly 26 grams of Potassium Iodide USP into a one liter bottle of water produces 1000 ml of Potassium Iodide solution with a strength of 130 mg for each 5 ml (1 teaspoon) of that Potassium Iodide (KI) solution. There are 200 of those 5 ml servings in that 1000 ml (1 liter). Five ml can be easily and accurately measured out with a common graduated medicine dropper or one teaspoon.

How often should I take KI?

A single dose of KI protects the thyroid gland for 24 hours. A one-time dose at the levels recommended in this fact sheet is usually all that is needed to protect the thyroid gland. In some cases, radioactive iodine might be in the environment for more than 24 hours. If that happens, local emergency management or public health officials may tell you to take one dose of KI every 24 hours for a few days. You should do this only on the advice of emergency management officials, public health officials, or your doctor. Avoid repeat dosing with KI for pregnant and breastfeeding women and newborn infants. Those individuals may need to be evacuated until levels of radioactive iodine in the environment fall.

Taking a higher dose of KI, or taking KI more often than recommended, does not offer more protection and can cause severe illness or death.

Medical conditions that may make it harmful to take KI

Taking KI may be harmful for some people because of the high levels of iodine in this medicine. You should not take KI if
- you know you are allergic to iodine (If you are unsure about this, consult your doctor. A seafood or shellfish allergy does not necessarily mean that you are allergic to iodine.) or
- you have certain skin disorders (such as dermatitis herpetiformis or urticaria vasculitis).

People with thyroid disease may be treated with KI. This should happen under careful supervision of a doctor, especially if dosing lasts for more than a few days.

In all cases, talk to your doctor if you are not sure whether to take KI.

What are the possible risks and side effects of KI?

When public health or emergency management officials tell the public to take KI following a radiologic or nuclear event, the benefits of taking this drug outweigh the risks. This is true for all age groups. Some general side effects caused by KI may include intestinal upset, allergic reactions (possibly severe), rashes, and inflammation of the salivary glands.

When taken as recommended, KI causes only rare adverse health effects that specifically involve the thyroid gland. In general, you are more likely to have an adverse health effect involving the thyroid gland if you

  • take a higher than recommended dose of KI,
  • take the drug for several days, or
  • have pre-existing thyroid disease.

Newborn infants (less than 1 month old) who receive more than one dose of KI are at particular risk for developing a condition known as hypothyroidism (thyroid hormone levels that are too low). If not treated, hypothyroidism can cause brain damage. Infants who receive KI should have their thyroid hormone levels checked and monitored by a doctor. Avoid repeat dosing of KI to newborns.

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Ingredients

USP Grade Potassium Iodide (KI) powder.

Instructions

Directions for Use

Add 1 level tablespoon (26 grams) of Potassium Iodide to one liter (34 oz) of water. Shake to mix until dissolved.

Each liter yields 200 of 5 ml servings. This produces 1000 ml of Potassium Iodide less than saturated solution with a strength of 130 mg of Iodine for each 5 ml (1 teaspoon) of Potassium Iodide solution, the recommended daily serving for emergency use in case of a nuclear accident that releases radioactive iodine into the air.

When this happens you have the greatest danger in the first day of the exposure. Radioactive iodine has the half-life of 8 days - 50% of it will decay by the 8th day. Your thyroid is always looking for iodine, and will pull in the toxic material, unless it is already saturated.

The jars are BPA-free, white heavy wall polypropylene. Potassium Iodide is stable. If unopened and kept dry, the shelf life is at least 7 years.

Recommended Use

Protect your thyroid gland from radioactive iodine damage (from a nuclear accident) with USP Grade Potassium Iodide (KI). Use 130 mg of Iodine per person per day until all fallout has dissipated. It is OK to use as iodine supplement.

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